Microsoft launches its alternative to Amazon’s SimpleDB

It was long thought that open source would represent the biggest challenge to traditional database vendors, but fast forward to today and the law of orthogonal technology innovation kicks into high gear as hosted databases go from a “wouldn’t that be pretty cool” to very real offerings.

Microsoft has begun signing up testers for SQL Server Data Services (SSDS), a forthcoming service that will allow customers and developers to host their data in a Microsoft-hosted database. So what is (and isn’t) SSDS, exactly? [From Microsoft launches its alternative to Amazon’s SimpleDB]

While the idea of taking down Oracle’s database business is indeed appealing to me, I doubt that will be the outcome of both SimpleDB and SDSS (seriously, why the hell can’t Microsoft acronyms as product names habit?) because for the time being the core enterprise software market is still oriented around on-premise offerings.

However, two interesting things have happened in recent years… I can’t think of a single company that has built a new product or company on a BEA stack or with an Oracle database or any other proprietary software stack. Open source technologies get their fair share of attention but if you were to poll 100 startups that have formed in recent years you would find a significant number of them are built on Amazon Web Services.

Secondly, non-relational database technologies are making inroads into the traditional enterprise market. StreamBase is one example, founded by one of the fathers of relational database technology, Mike Stonebraker, the company has been focusing on complex event processing in financial services. SimpleDB itself is another example, representing a dramatic departure from relational database systems.

These services are starting to make their way on to enterprise desktops and just like was the case with open source we can expect that enterprise osmosis will bring them into IT. Salesforce.com is also playing a role in this as well with their Force.com offering, which combines data storage with application development tools.

I haven’t seen any acceleration of Force.com in the marketplace, but this is probably less about the technology and more about the peripatetic approach to marketing it, which certainly hasn’t been helped by their identity crisis that drives the confusion around what name is it being called this month.

Give it a couple of years and I strongly believe that big enterprise IT shops and systems integrators will be enthusiastic users of these new hosted infrastructure technologies if for no other reason than the cost of building with them and maintaining them as needs scale is a fraction of on premise infrastructure.

Amazon World Domination Can Now Begin

AWS filled a major gap in their offering with the addition of SimpleDB. Two things jumped out at me, the first being that it’s optimized for very large datasets and the second, more important as well, observation is that it’s designed around search indexes instead of schemas.

There’s a lot more to be said about SimpleDB, most of it beyond my technical capabilities but it is safe to say that just as was the case when AWS first launched, the impact it would have was underestimated at the time.

Well after being under NDA for so long, I’m glad to be able to say that Amazon SimpleDB has gone into limited beta. Congratulations to everyone on the SDS / SimpleDB team; their several years of work on SimpleDB (formerly called SDS) is a brilliant piece of engineering. [From inside looking out » What You Need To Know About Amazon SimpleDB]