Evernote Specialized Apps

Evernote is launching an app called Food that people can use to capture the meals and recipes they love. This is smart, wicked smart.

The app isn’t just a better recipe app, which would require a backend service like AllRecipes, Food is a way to capture the experience of food in multiple dimensions, including what you actually ate, the wine you enjoyed, who you shared it all with and in the case of a restaurant, where you were. This is fundamentally and disruptively different than a better recipe application, but oh yeah, it also allows you to capture and build recipes… which is what a lot of people, like me, use Evernote for already.

We are seeing Evernote enter a new phase where they build on the extraordinary success of their platform and synchronization capability to deliver functionally specific applications that increase the time we spend in the Evernote world and entrench the company as a key player in the mobile to fixed computing ecosystem.

Available on iOS, I am anxiously awaiting their release of an Android version.

 

More on this topic (What's this?)
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Triple Crises: Land, Water and Food
Read more on Food & Beverage, Wine Consumption at Wikinvest

Satellites

Phoneflix has completely changed my interactions with Netflix. Now, wherever I am I can open it on my iPhone and manage my Netflix queue. It’s as random as while watching television or at the car wash or even sitting is a movie theatre watching previews.

TweetDeck (and Thwirl before it) accelerated my twitter usage. Yammer’s desktop AIR client is universally regarded as compelling within our company, contributing to our usage rates.

The Evernote iPhone app is not only handy for putting my notes on my mobile device, but it also serves as notetaker itself when nothing else is available. My connection to Evernote is stronger than just with web and desktop experiences.

For all of the benefits that web-based applications provide, user experience alone is generally not one of them. Small, high performance, persistent desktop apps can intensify usage which can then lead to broader adoption and with mobile apps, specifically the iPhone but eventually more mobile platforms, this goes to a whole new level.

When I talk with companies, big and small, I am struck by the “we’ll do that eventually” attitude that the majority have. The view that these satellite interfaces are somehow optional or just extra is a miscalculation.

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