Turn the Tables

adhesivo fight the powerThis week the crazy internets have been abuzz with the story of AOL executive Ryan Block, who attempted to do something rather mundane, cancel his cable, and was subjected to an excruciatingly long ordeal with the customer service representative at Comcast. This is well covered, I don’t need to relive it… and more to the point, we’ve all been there.

What makes this story, and others like it, catch fire is that there is a recording to go with the narrative. The call experience comes alive with the voice recording.

This is a relatively recent phenomena and one that is a result of powerful digital technology shifts that have driven the communication revolution that has swept the globe. This is the part of the story that makes me absolutely giddy because it’s technology as a great democratizer of power against monopolistic corporations that don’t care about us until it blows up in their face.

It’s no surprise that the more power companies have in the market the worse their customer support becomes and they know it. While giving lip service to customer satisfaction, the fact remains that these companies know that customer service is ultimately a cost center, not a profit center. The people hired into these roles may be well meaning, but they know they are a cog in a machine and, ultimately, replaceable. The incentives and measurement systems prioritize retention above all else, not problem resolution, and they practically beg you to provide a good score in the post call interview.

As a result of the perennially poor customer service environment I have opted to turn the tables. I never make a customer service call that isn’t recorded, using an app called MP3 Call Recorder. It is also possible to record the call through Google Voice but this only works for inbound calls so use Gethuman.com to have the company call you back to your gVoice number.

In California, where I live, there is an explicit legal requirement that 2 party consent is granted before recording voice calls, but I figure that call centers routinely notify me that my calls are being recorded for “quality and training” so I figure that consent has been granted. Besides, this is a criminal statute and I think that odds of a prosecutor bringing a case against me for recording my customer service experience at, for example, Visa to be 0%… 0.00% probable. Bring it, I’d love to be that person.

Social technologies continue reshaping how brands interact with customers, and it’s good for customers when everything is out in the open and public. What Block did, and I wish I had his demeanor and patience in such a situation, is something that brands should pay attention to because their well cultivated brand images suffer real setbacks when their bad behavior, driven by perverse employee incentives, become public. Comcast has spent years telling the market that they are different now and care about customers. The countless dollars on advertising, speeches, and public proclamations evaporated as a result of a 20 minutes customer service call. Imagine that multiplied by thousands.

Bonus: This calls for a Monty Python clip