Fan Power

This was a surprisingly interesting op-ed, not interesting because it is penned by a glam celebrity but because op-eds are typically not insightful and rooted in facts, as this one is.

Yes, the entertainment industry is changing, as it has always done, but in this case the influence of social media – the broadcast medium of our century – can’t be underestimated. Swift writes about the changing relationship with fans and this mimics what is happening across the spectrum, companies are being forced into a new form of intimacy with customers. Musicians my recoil at the notion that fans are customers, but that’s exactly what they are, and in 2014 what fans expect from entertainers is a different experience than the music alone… they want a relationship.

One point that Swift misses on is the notion that music is art and because art is rare it is inherently valuable. This could not be further from the truth when it comes to music, television, and movies. These forms of entertainment are digital in nature and therefore infinitely reproducible in pitch perfect form. Rare art is a painting or sculpture or some other form of analog inspiration and beautification, it can only be reproduced in original form by the artist and that is indeed rare.

Music is art, and art is important and rare. Important, rare things are valuable. Valuable things should be paid for. It’s my opinion that music should not be free, and my prediction is that individual artists and their labels will someday decide what an album’s price point is. I hope they don’t underestimate themselves or undervalue their art.

For music, books, movies, etc., the market sets a price and discards the notion of rarity altogether.