Link-o-Rama

- Here’s an update on the potential for hydrogen in energy production. Nothing terribly surprising but it does sum up the major hurdles that are being crossed in developing this technology.

- Facebook may not be Skynet but it is getting smarter and that’s bad for Google... yeah, it’s a parallel web that allows data in/out only through authorized channels. I’m wondering if it’s not just bad for Google but bad for everyone else as well…

- How America’s ruling class buys its way into elite colleges. If there were ever a case for the destructive consequences of “two Americas” it is in our education system.

- In-Q-Tel, the CIA’s venture fund, participated in a funding round for LensVector. This company has a really fascinating technology for camera lens that results in completely solid state focusing systems with no moving parts.

- The FCC reveals a rather embarrassing initiative aimed at reviving the failed CableCard technology as an internet browsing technology… I guess the FCC is trying to rebound from the ass whooping they took in the Comcast case.

- The California PUC has ordered utilities to give up data collected from “smart meters”. I wrote about this last year when I covered my own experiences with smart meters, concluding at the time that utility companies just don’t have a mindset that allows them to think about data as a service they are providing. I’m glad the PUC ordered it but like all things involving utilities (and telcos), I’ll believe it when I see it.

- Nielsen reports that Facebook’s ads actually work pretty well... go figure.

- Ben Horowitz pens a thoughtful post detailing the challenges of bringing big company executives into startups. My favorite bit was “force them to create”… which I guess translates into “force them to actually do stuff… something not required in a big company”.

- The iPad could cripple sales of in vehicle DVD systems… is there anything the iPad can’t do? This is actually a pretty solid argument and maps well to something similar I wrote last year about how the iPhone (and competitors) could kill in vehicle navigation systems and car companies have no one to blame but themselves.

- Dell’s Android handset, the Thunder, looks like it’s bringing a little lightning with it as well. It looks hot, I’m almost ready to say I want one. I say almost because my experience with my wife’s Droid taught me that Android has a lot of sizzle without the steak (she ended up ditching the Droid after having it replaced 3 times for screen failures, she’s back to her trusty Blackberry now). Windows 7 Mobile is also getting a lot of good reviews, will be interested to see how that looks when it hits the market… competition is good.

- 5 popular photography techniques.

- Altimeter’s Ray Wang has a slick new website up and running.

- HP released a 3D printer that takes 3D CAD drawings and converts them into ABS (plastic) models. At $17k this is no impulse buy but it is at a price point significantly lower than CNC carving machines while appearing more capable and easy to use than CNC variants.

- Is God a mathematician? Good question.

- My friend Tom Foremski’s new initiative “every company is a media company” is spot on.

- Dion Hinchcliffe joined the Dachis Group (as did Susan Scrupski’s 2.0 Council) and wrote a really interesting missive on “The Social Enterprise, a Case for Disruptive Transformation“. I keep thinking about this as I ponder social CRM… Don Bulmer (SAP) has been writing some really good stuff on the “boundaryless enterprise”, I’ll track down the links and tweet them.

- John Hagel: From Push to Pull. It’s a must read piece.

- Really interesting look at Kachingle. Not only does this introduce a really innovative revenue model for media sites but the experience of Kachingle trying to sell it to big newspapers should be a cautionary tale for anyone interested in this market.

- The 20 worst VC investments of all time… no real surprises here and the schadenfreude isn’t that fulfilling.

- A compressed air powered car sets a speed record at Bonneville.

- Sesame Street parody videos target Google.