Tagging Mail

This is an interesting adaptation of tag technology, but I’m still not getting how it’s different than using categories or flags.

MailTags lets you assign keywords to individual messages. The great thing about keywords, as opposed to simply moving messages to folders, is that you can assign multiple keywords to a given message. For example, if Christopher Breen sends me an e-mail about an iPod product, I can assign the keywords Macworld, Playlist, and iPod to the message. The message would then appear in Smart Mailboxes (or specific searches) that include any of these search terms, even if the actual e-mail message doesn’t contain any of these words. (In effect, it’s as if I moved this single message into three mail folders.)

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P2P lending

I collect woodworking tools (and know a few things about using them) and like most collectors of things I subscribe to a number of forums that represent “enthusiast communities”. Before I get to that I want to give you a little background on vintage woodworking tools. Sandpaper is a relatively new invention, I believe it was invented in the 1930′s, wood that was milled and smoothed before that was likely done with a cutting tool like a hand plane, spokeshave, chisel, or scraper.

In the 19h century there was a vibrant tool making community of literally thousands of companies across America and Europe and that existed largely up until the turn of the century when the mechanization of so many trades relegated hand tools to shop shelves and worse, the trash pile.

There has always been an interest in vintage handtools and an appreciation of the skill required to produce them. You can buy vintage tools at auctions or Ebay, everything from tired Bedrock planes and Stanley 750 chisels that probably were found in a garage after decades of sitting around to rare specialty tools that have not been made in decades (think about all the trim in those beautiful Victorian homes in SF… all made by hand at one time). They fetch good money, as an example, some of the mass produced Bailey and Bedrock hand planes from the pre-WWII era that can still be found at garage sales for a few dollars can command up to $1,000 and more, depending on the rarity, from a collector. It’s not uncommon to see rare tools, like coachmakers plough planes, sell at auction for tens of thousands of dollars.

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