Brent Thill leaving Prudential

Anyone who follows financial analyst coverage of enterprise software no doubt knows the name Brent Thill. While at Prudential Brent has developed a reputation for having deep insight into enterprise software companies and their performance and has consistently performed well from a ratings perspective. I just learned today that Brent is leaving Prudential to lead software research at Citigroup. Congratulations are in order.

No software industry in the EU and open source is under the thumb of big business

The title of this post more or less reflects the comments of Jesús Villasante, the head of software technologies at the EC’s Information Society and Media Directorate General for the European Union. Link via Mark.

Villasante is critical of open source for not standing up and sticking it to the man, apparently he is of the opinion that open source is a zero sum game where OSS wins when traditional, which I guess means proprietary, technology loses.

“Open source communities need to take themselves seriously and realise they have contribution to themselves and society. From the moment they realise they are part of the evolution of society and try to influence it, we will be moving in the right direction,”

Where do I even go with that quote, it’s filled with self righteousness and indignation about the “American multinationals” that control the technology industry to the detriment of the EU.

“the open source community today [is a] subcontractor of American multinationals,”

Maybe the solution is to have the EU establish a tax that could be levied against OSS companies and “American multinationals” alike and used to fund a research institute that will provide jobs for European software engineers who want to work on socially responsible technology projects, the results of which will be licensed back to OSS in order to incentivize them to be better citizens? Damn, I should run for a seat in the EU Parliament. My first order of business, in order to increase EU competitiveness, would be to eliminate the level of beaurocracy that results in officials making statements like this:

“Firstly, I’m not responsible for software patents — the software patent directive is managed by the director general of Internal [Market]. The opinion of the director general of Information Society [the division where Villasante works] is not necessarily the same as the director general of Internal.”

Maybe Villasante should give up his plush post at the EU and go out and sling it in the real world before lecturing the open source community on how to change it.

IBM sets up SOA hub in India – Computerworld

In a comment to an earlier post, Vinnie asked if IBM itself was innovative. I really don’t know the answer to that question, but their initiative to setup a global hub for SOA component assembly (via Charles) is pretty damn impressive if anything because of the shere scale of the initiative. From what I read about it I don’t think you would classify this as IBM being innovative, but rather an example of IBM recognizing an opportunity to capture the innovation of their customer facing consultants and their clients themselves, and then setting up the infrastructure to make it happen.

BTW, to hell with being PC, I don’t think that large companies in any industry are prone to being innovative.

The ideas for new replicable components will typically come from clients and field staff, Porta said. IBM Solutions Boards will evaluate suggestions and once approved, the management of component development will be handed over to the Global Business Solutions Center.

PunditGuy: The New York Times, Wal-Mart, and Me

The NYTimes questions the objectivity of those who write about Wal-Mart based on information they get from the company. So basically the NYTimes is implying that if I write anything based on information that is provided to me by a company itself, then I must be biased in favor of that company… but I thought reporters and journalists write all the time about things that company representatives send them? Me confused, head hurt.

In today’s story, Barbaro finds that the retailer has enlisted the help of individual bloggers who have previously identified themselves as being sympathetic to Wal-Mart’s cause. Barbaro questions the independence of the bloggers who receive pro Wal-Mart news from Mr. Manson.

Are You Ready For Wireless USB?

Wireless USB sounds great for printers and other large devices, but the primary benefit that I get from USB is the ability to use my computer as a power source. I am assuming that since nobody I have read about has figured out how to deliver power over the air, that wireless USB devices will require their own power source.

According to a post on news.com, wireless USB devices will begin arriving in September of this year, they will operate at 480mbps speed when within 10 feet and at 110mbps speeds up to the maximum of 30 feet away.

Blogroll and favorites

I am taking down my blogroll for a refurbishing as it’s gotten a little out of control. I am using Feeddemon as my primary feed reader, and with version 2.0 syching with Newsgator’s online service it is really easy to keep everything synced up. However, Newsgator’s blogroll script leaves a lot to be desired, namely folders, so I’m going to check out some other blogroll services while I also clean up the blogroll itself.

Also, you will notice that I am using Technorati’s Favorites service and have linked it to my sidebar. Maybe I can talk Dave into featuring me on Technorati’s site once I get enough of a favorites collection built up :)

IBM – Chief Innovation Officer

IBM is promoting a new term “Chief Innovation Officer (CIO)” and while I don’t normally raise an eyebrow about these things (I really don’t give a crap about titles, it’s what you are able to influence and actually accomplish that matters) I do think this is an interesting idea that I hope more companies pick up and empower.

The consequence: the CIO’s new role extends far beyond that of technologist. The new CIO provides unique input into the core strategic direction of his organization. He interprets the potential for technology to transform the business, drive innovation and spur growth. He helps to map out the gaps between the organization’s business growth agenda and its IT infrastructure. He transforms himself from a reactive cost-cutter to a proactive advocate of how and where the application of IT can create the business value of tomorrow.

Six Apart launches enterprise blogging service and product

Six Apart announced two new services today, the first being Typepad Business Class is a hosted service with security, management, and integration features that should appeal to a wide array of business customers that want to get started with blogs with low cost and practically no IT requirements.

The second product announcement is Movable Type Enterprise. This product has a number of new features, but two things that really rise to the level of must haves for enterprise customers like SAP, directory (LDAP) integration and email features. It’s good to see a company taking a lead in not only building in features for enterprise customers, but also taking a lead in promoting the use of blogging as a tool behind the firewall.

I’ve been pretty tough on Six Apart for the issues that Typepad has experienced and the inconvenience this caused me, but I’m also a big fan of the company and the people behind it. When I had to select a platform for SAP’s internal blogging network it was not a tough choice, I chose Movable Type.